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Santiago Rivera
Santiago Rivera

The Edward C. Atwater Collection of American Popular Medicine and Health Reform: A Treasure Trove for Historians - Bulletin of the History of Medicine


Here is the outline of the article: # An Annotated Catalogue of the Edward C. Atwater Collection of American Popular Medicine and Health Reform: Volume III, Supplement: A-Z ## Introduction - What is the Edward C. Atwater Collection of American Popular Medicine and Health Reform? - Why is it important and valuable for historians and researchers? - What are the main features and highlights of Volume III, Supplement: A-Z? ## The Catalogue: Supplement - How is the catalogue organized and annotated? - What are some examples of books, manuscripts, pamphlets, periodicals, and printed ephemera included in this volume? - How do they reflect the diverse and evolving views on popular medicine and health reform in America from the colonial period to World War I? ## Table of Subject Headings - What are the subject headings used to classify the items in the catalogue? - How do they help users to find relevant information and topics? - What are some of the most common and interesting subject headings in this volume? ## Combined Subject Index to Volumes I, II, and III - What is the purpose and function of the combined subject index? - How does it enable users to access the entire collection across all three volumes? - What are some of the advantages and limitations of using this index? ## Conclusion - What are the main contributions and achievements of this catalogue project? - How does it enhance our understanding and appreciation of American popular medicine and health reform history? - What are some of the future directions and challenges for this field of study? ## FAQs - Q: Who is Edward C. Atwater and how did he collect these items? - Q: How can I access the Edward C. Atwater Collection of American Popular Medicine and Health Reform? - Q: How can I cite or quote from this catalogue or the items in the collection? - Q: What are some of the other resources or publications related to this collection or this field of study? - Q: How can I contribute or donate to this collection or this catalogue project? Here is the article based on that outline: # An Annotated Catalogue of the Edward C. Atwater Collection of American Popular Medicine and Health Reform: Volume III, Supplement: A-Z ## Introduction Have you ever wondered how Americans learned about health and medicine in the past? How did they treat their illnesses or injuries at home? What kind of advice did they receive from doctors, nurses, or quacks? What were their beliefs and practices regarding sexuality, reproduction, hygiene, nutrition, or mental health? If you are curious about these questions, you might want to check out a remarkable collection of books, manuscripts, pamphlets, periodicals, and printed ephemera that document the history of American popular medicine and health reform from the colonial period to World War I. This collection is known as the Edward C. Atwater Collection of American Popular Medicine and Health Reform, and it is housed at the Edward G. Miner Library at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The collection was assembled by Edward C. Atwater, a retired professor of medicine and history of medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He began collecting these items in 1960s as a hobby, but soon realized their historical significance and value. He donated his collection to the Edward G. Miner Library in 1997. The collection contains more than 10,000 items that cover a wide range of topics related to popular medicine and health reform in America. Some examples are: - Domestic medicine manuals that instructed Americans on how to treat common ailments or emergencies at home, such as Buchan's Domestic Medicine or The Family Physician. - Pamphlets and periodicals that promoted various health reform movements, such as vegetarianism, hydrotherapy, temperance, phrenology, or mesmerism. - Books and manuscripts that discussed controversial issues such as birth control, abortion, venereal diseases, masturbation, or sexual hygiene. - Printed ephemera that advertised patent medicines, quack remedies, medical devices, or health resorts. These items reflect the diverse and evolving views on health and medicine in America over time. They also reveal the social, cultural, economic, and political factors that influenced these views. They are invaluable sources for historians and researchers who want to study the history of American popular medicine and health reform. One of the main challenges of using this collection is finding the relevant items and information. The collection is so large and varied that it can be overwhelming and confusing for users. To address this problem, a team of librarians and scholars have worked on creating a comprehensive catalogue of the collection. The catalogue provides detailed descriptions and annotations of each item in the collection, as well as subject headings and indexes to help users locate and access them. The catalogue project started in 1997 and was completed in 2008. It consists of three volumes that cover the entire collection. The first volume (Authors A-L) was published in 2001, the second volume (Authors M-Z) was published in 2004, and the third and final volume (Supplement: A-Z) was published in 2008. This article will focus on the third volume of the catalogue, which is titled An Annotated Catalogue of the Edward C. Atwater Collection of American Popular Medicine and Health Reform: Volume III, Supplement: A-Z. This volume contains entries for more than 2,000 items that were acquired by Edward C. Atwater after the publication of the first two volumes. It also includes a table of subject headings and a combined subject index to all three volumes. In this article, we will explore the main features and highlights of this volume, and how it can help users to access and appreciate this amazing collection of American popular medicine and health reform history. ## The Catalogue: Supplement The catalogue is organized alphabetically by author or title of each item in the collection. Each entry provides the following information: - The title and imprint of the item, including the place and date of publication. - The physical description of the item, such as its size, format, pagination, illustrations, or binding. - The annotation of the item, which summarizes its content, context, significance, or rarity. - The location number of the item in the Edward G. Miner Library. - The subject headings assigned to the item based on a predefined list of categories. The entries are numbered sequentially from S1 to S1547. The letter S indicates that these items are part of the supplement volume. The entries are also cross-referenced with other entries in the same or previous volumes by using asterisks (*) or daggers (). The annotation of each item is one of the most important and useful features of the catalogue. It provides users with a concise and informative overview of each item's content and relevance. It also highlights some of the interesting or unusual aspects of each item, such as its authorship, provenance, edition, condition, or illustrations. The annotation is based on careful examination and research of each item by Christopher Hoolihan, who is the Rare Books and Manuscripts Librarian at the Edward G. Miner Library. He also compiled and edited the entire catalogue project. Here are some examples of entries from this volume: ### S1 Abernethy, John (1764-1831). Surgical observations on diseases resembling syphilis; ... Philadelphia: Published by James Webster ... 1819. 8vo (22 cm). viii [9]-216 p.; contemporary sheep; red leather spine label; joints cracked; spine ends chipped; corners worn; foxed throughout; ex libris Edward C. Atwater. Abernethy was a prominent English surgeon who taught at St Bartholomew's Hospital in London. He was known for his innovative surgical techniques and his eccentric personality. He was also a popular lecturer and writer on various medical topics. This book is one of his most influential works on venereal diseases. He argued that many diseases that resembled syphilis were actually caused by different agents or factors. He classified these diseases into four types: simple venereal ulcer; phagedenic ulcer; sloughing ulcer; and irritable ulcer. He described their symptoms, causes, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment in detail. He also discussed some related topics such as vaccination, mercury poisoning, scrofula, cancer, scurvy, leprosy, elephantiasis, etc. He criticized some of the prevailing theories and methods of his contemporaries, and advocated a more rational and scientific approach to medicine. He also introduced some innovations in surgical practice, such as the use of ligatures to control bleeding, the removal of diseased bone or tissue, and the treatment of aneurysms by tying off the artery above the affected area. He was one of the first surgeons to perform the operation of ligating the external iliac artery for iliac aneurysm in 1796. [2] He was a Fellow of the Royal Society and a member of several medical societies. He was also a popular and influential lecturer and writer on various medical topics. He published several books and articles on anatomy, physiology, surgery, pathology, and natural history. He was known for his witty and eccentric style of expression, which often amused or annoyed his audiences and readers. He retired from his surgical practice in 1827, and died in 1831 at his country house in Enfield. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Enfield. [2] This book is a first American edition of one of his most influential works on venereal diseases. It was originally published in London in 1810, and reprinted several times. It was based on his lectures at St Bartholomew's Hospital, and dedicated to his friend and colleague Sir William Blizard. The book is divided into two parts. The first part contains six chapters that discuss the general principles and causes of venereal diseases, their diagnosis and prognosis, and their treatment by mercury or other means. The second part contains twelve chapters that describe the various types of venereal ulcers and their complications, such as phimosis, paraphimosis, fistulae, strictures, etc. The book is illustrated with four engraved plates that depict different forms of venereal ulcers. The plates are numbered I-IV and are bound at the end of the book. They are copied from the original London edition. The book is bound in contemporary sheep with a red leather spine label. It has some signs of wear and tear, such as cracked joints, chipped spine ends, worn corners, and foxing throughout. It has an ex libris label of Edward C. Atwater on the front pastedown. The book is classified under the subject headings: Venereal diseases; Syphilis; Ulcers; Surgery. ### S2 Abortion. A letter to a member of Parliament on the present state of affairs between Great Britain and America; ... London: Printed for J. Almon ... 1774. 8vo (20 cm). 32 p.; disbound; title-page soiled; ex libris Edward C. Atwater. This pamphlet is an anonymous political satire that uses the metaphor of abortion to criticize the British government's policies towards its American colonies. It was published in 1774, shortly after the passage of the Coercive Acts (also known as the Intolerable Acts), which were intended to punish the colonists for their resistance to British authority. The pamphlet is written in the form of a letter from a British citizen to a member of Parliament. The author argues that the British government has been acting like an unnatural mother who wants to abort her child (America) because she is ashamed of its illegitimate birth (the result of colonization). He compares the Coercive Acts to various methods of abortion, such as poison, instruments, or violence. He warns that such attempts will only endanger the mother's life (Britain's prosperity) and provoke the child's resentment (America's rebellion). He suggests that instead of aborting America, Britain should acknowledge its paternity (its rights and privileges) and treat it with affection (justice and lenity). He claims that this would be more beneficial for both parties, as they would enjoy a mutual love and respect (a harmonious union). He concludes by urging the member of Parliament to use his influence to persuade the government to change its course of action before it is too late. The pamphlet is disbound and has no covers or binding. The title-page is soiled and has some stains. It has an ex libris label of Edward C. Atwater on the verso. The pamphlet is classified under the subject headings: Abortion; United States--History--Revolution--Causes; Great Britain--Colonies--America; Political satire. ### S3 Abortion. An essay on quickening: proving abortion to be murder from that period ... By John Burns ... Glasgow: Printed by D. Niven ... 1803. 12mo (17 cm). 36 p.; disbound; title-page soiled; ex libris Edward C. Atwater. This pamphlet is a medical and moral treatise on the issue of abortion, written by John Burns, a Scottish surgeon and obstetrician. He was a professor of surgery at the University of Glasgow and the author of several books on midwifery and anatomy. The pamphlet is based on a paper that he read before the Glasgow Medical Society in 1802. He argues that abortion is murder from the moment of quickening, which he defines as the first perceptible motion of the fetus in the womb. He claims that this is the point when the fetus acquires a distinct and independent existence, and becomes a living being with a soul. He supports his argument with various proofs from anatomy, physiology, embryology, natural history, and theology. He also refutes some of the common objections and excuses for abortion, such as the uncertainty of pregnancy, the danger of childbirth, the deformity or disease of the fetus, or the poverty or disgrace of the mother. He concludes by appealing to the conscience and humanity of his readers, and urging them to respect and protect the sacred rights of unborn children. The pamphlet is disbound and has no covers or binding. The title-page is soiled and has some stains. It has an ex libris label of Edward C. Atwater on the verso. The pamphlet is classified under the subject headings: Abortion; Fetus--Movement; Quickening; Murder. ## Table of Subject Headings The table of subject headings is a list of categories that are used to classify the items in the catalogue according to their main topics or themes. The table is located at the end of the catalogue, before the combined subject index. The table contains 215 subject headings, arranged alphabetically. Each subject heading is followed by a brief definition or explanation of its scope and content. Some subject headings are further subdivided into subheadings, which are indented under the main heading. The table of subject headings is based on a system that was developed by Edward C. Atwater and Christopher Hoolihan for the first volume of the catalogue. The system was modified and expanded for the second and third volumes to accommodate new items and topics. The table of subject headings is a useful tool for users who want to find items related to a specific topic or theme in the collection. For example, if a user is interested in items about abortion, they can look up the subject heading "Abortion" in the table and find its definition and subheadings: Abortion. The termination of pregnancy before viability; includes spontaneous abortion (miscarriage) and induced abortion (therapeutic or elective). Subheadings: Abortion--Criminal aspects; Abortion--Moral and religious aspects; Abortion--Social aspects. The user can then use these subheadings to narrow down their search or browse the catalogue for relevant entries. For example, they can find entry S2 under the subheading "Abortion--Moral and religious aspects". The table of subject headings also helps users to discover related or overlapping topics in the collection. For example, if a user is interested in items about birth control, they can look up the subject heading "Birth control" in the table and find its definition and subheadings: Birth control. The prevention of conception or pregnancy by various methods; includes contraception (the use of devices or drugs) and sterilization (the surgical alteration of reproductive organs). Subheadings: Birth control--History; Birth control--Law and legislation; Birth control--Moral and religious aspects; Birth control--Social aspects. The user can then use these subheadings to narrow down their search or browse the catalogue for relevant entries. For example, they can find entry S4 under the subheading "Birth control--History". The user can also notice that some subject headings are cross-referenced with other subject headings by using the symbol "See also". For example, under the subject heading "Birth control", there is a cross-reference to "Abortion": See also Abortion This means that there are some items in the collection that deal with both birth control and abortion, or that these topics are closely related or interrelated. The user can then use this cross-reference to expand their search or explore other aspects of their topic. The table of subject headings is not a comprehensive or definitive list of all possible topics or themes in the collection. It is based on the judgment and interpretation of Edward C. Atwater and Christopher Hoolihan, who selected and defined the subject headings according to their knowledge and expertise. The table is also limited by the availability and diversity of items in the collection, which may not cover every aspect or perspective of a topic. Therefore, users should not rely solely on the table of subject headings to find items or information in the collection. They should also use other methods of searching or browsing, such as using keywords, titles, authors, dates, etc., or consulting other sources or experts. ## Combined Subject Index to Volumes I, II, and III The combined subject index is an alphabetical list of all the subject headings and subheadings that are used in all three volumes of the catalogue. It is located at the end of the catalogue, after the table of subject headings. The combined subject index provides users with a quick and easy way to access all the entries in the collection that are classified under a specific subject heading or subheading. For each subject heading or subheading, it gives the volume number (I, II, or III), entry number (S1-S1547), and page number where it can be found. For example, if a user wants to find all the entries that are classified under "Abortion", they can look up this subject heading in the combined subject index and find: Abortion I: 1-2; II: 1-3; III: S2-S3 This means that there are two entries under "Abortion" in volume I, three entries in volume II, and two entries in volume III. The user can then go to the corresponding volume, entry number, and page number to read the full description and annotation of each entry. The combined subject index also indicates the subheadings that are used under each subject heading by using parentheses. For example, under "Abortion", there are four subheadings: Abortion (Criminal aspects) I: 3; II: 4-5; III: S4 Abortion (Moral and religious aspects) I: 4-6; II: 6-8; III: S2 Abortion (Social aspects) I: 7-8; II: 9-10; III: S5 Abortion (Spontaneous) I: 9; II: 11 This means that there are one entry under "Abortion (Criminal aspects)" in volume I, two entries in volume II, and one entry in volume III; three entries under "Abortion (Moral and religious aspects)" in volume I, three entries in volume II, and one entry in volume III; and so on. The user can then use these subheadings to narrow down their search or browse the catalogue for relevant entries. For example, they can find entry S2 under "Abortion (Moral and religious aspects)" in volume III. The combined subject index also indicates the cross-references that are used between subject headings by using the symbol "See also"


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